Coming Up at the International Dance Festival Birmingham 2014

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With the International Dance Festival Birmingham 2014 now over a week underway, there are still plenty more exciting shows to look forward to before the month is through.

After their eagerly anticipated openings last night, both Sylvie Guillem’s 6000 Miles Away and the Aakash Odedra Company’s double bill Murmur & Inked will be returning this evening to the Birmingham Hippodrome, on the main stage and in the Patrick Centre, respectively. Widely hailed as one of the world’s greatest dancers, in 6000 Miles Away, Sylvie Guillem performs William Forsythe’s Rearray and Mats Ek’s Bye, set to Beethoven’s last sonata. Meanwhile, in Murmur and Inked, Aakash Odedra collaborates with choreographer Lewis Major, the Ars Electronica Futurelab and Oliver Award-winner Damien Jalet, to explore themes of dyslexia and the transformation of the body through scarring and tattoos.

Bye, solo choreographed by Mats Ek for Sylvie Guillem 2010

From Thursday through to the weekend, you’ll be able to catch some awe-inspiring acrobatics from groundbreaking Montreal circus company Les 7 Doigts de la Main in Séquence 8 at the Birmingham REP, as well as some impressive work from Birmingham City University’s School of Architecture, which will be displayed in a Millennium Point open exhibition titled All of Birmingham is a Stage.

OOn Friday and Saturday, Company Decalage will present a world premiere double bill of Match & Half Way to the Other Side in the Hippodrome’s Patrick Centre, while outside, Corey Baker Dance will be giving passers-by the chance to experience some traditional Maori Haka dancing in Centenary Square.

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Next week’s festivities will kick off on Tuesday with Border Tales from Luca Silvestrini’s Protein, a witty, satirical show blending dance, dialogue and live music, and taking place in the Patrick Centre. From Wednesday, the Hippodrome’s main stage will be taken over by Matthew Bourne’s New Adventures for a chilling yet beautiful dance adaptation of William Golding’s The Lord of the Flies. Finally on Saturday, those a little more strapped for cash can enjoy an array of free, outdoor dance performances at Put Your Foot Down in Spiceall Street, near the Bullring.

There’ll also be lots to see and do during the last week of the festival (more on this soon), including DJs, dancers, workshops and demonstrations and Sadler’s Wells’s Breakin’ Convention, and an exploration of Argentinian tango in Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui’s M¡longa, both in the Hippodrome theatre.

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For more information on all upcoming shows and to book tickets, visit the IDFB website.

International Dance Festival Birmingham – Get Ready for a Month of Dance Shows!

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From now until Sunday 25th May, a series of exciting dance events will be taking place in venues across the city as part of this year’s International Dance Festival Birmingham.

Jointly produced by the Birmingham Hippodrome and DanceXchange, the IDFB ranks among the world’s biggest dance festivals, and aims to showcase a diverse array of talent in styles and settings ranging from ballet to urban fusion, traditional Maori to circus skills, pop-up street performances to seated theatre shows. Whether you’re a die-hard dance fan or simply interested in finding out more, you’re almost guaranteed to find something to catch your interest on this year’s jam-packed schedule!

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Having already kicked off with a collection of short works by the Birmingham Royal Ballet at the Crescent Theatre, the programme of events continues this evening with the Midlands Youth Dance Festival, organised by Dance4 in collaboration with DanceXchange.

On Tuesday, I’ll be attending Sideways Rain, a contemporary dance performance by Genevan company Alias and the first of several shows taking place at the Hippodrome over the next few weeks (watch this space for my review). Other shows coming up at the Hippodrome include Kidd Pivot’s Tempest Replica, Sylvie Guillem’s 6000 Miles Away, New Adventures’ The Lord of the Flies, Sadler’s Wells’s Breakin’ Convention and Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui’s M¡longa. The theatre’s Patrick Centre will also be taken over at different points during the festival by Murmur & Inked, a double bill from the highly sought-after Aakash Odedra Company; the world premiere of Company Decalage’s Match & Halfway to the Other Side; Aerites’s witty, hip-hop fusion piece Planites; and Protein’s Border Tales, a satirical blend of dance, dialogue and live music.

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Elsewhere, Symphony Hall will play host to the world premiere of Concert Dansé, a unique collaboration between Birmingham’s Ex Cathedra choir and Québécois dance troupe Cas Public, while at the Birmingham REP, you’ll be able to catch some spectacular circus skills in Séquence 8 from Les 7 Doits De La Main. The IDFB will even be extending its reach beyond Birmingham’s borders to Coventry’s Warwick Arts Centre with Fabulous Beast Dance Theatre‘s sharply contrasting Petrushka and The Rite of Spring shows.

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If you don’t have much cash to splash this month, though, you needn’t miss out on the festivities: there will also be plenty of free outdoor shows taking place at Village Green, Cannon Hill Park and throughout the city centre. These include Corey Baker Dance‘s mobile, audience-led Headphones (follow @IDFB #headphones on Twitter to find out the exact locations on the day, and send in your dance styles and music genres choices); traditional Maori Haka demonstrations; Denada Dance Theatre’s “duel of seduction”, Young Man!; Candoco Dance Company’s Tennesee Williams-inspired duet, Studies For C; and various freestyle and urban shows from professional and community groups. Work by students from Birmingham City University’s School of Architecture will also be displayed in an exhibition at Millennium Point titled “All of Birmingham is a Stage” .

For more information on times and locations, and to book tickets for indoor shows, visit the IDFB website.

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Making a Storm this Spring – Singin’ in the Rain & Happy Days

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Full of Spring cheer and energy, two massive musical shows guaranteed to brighten up the rainy days will be bounding over to the Birmingham Hippodrome in March and April.

James Leece as Don, Amy Ellen Richardson as Kathy & Stephane Anelli as Cosmo in Singin' in the Rain - Photo credit Hugo GlendinningFirst up, on Tuesday 18th March, Chichester Festival Theatre’s acclaimed production of Singin’ in the Rain will make its down from the West End’s iconic Palace Theatre. So far, the show has received four Olivier Award nominations, and has played to over 750,000 people. Due to massive demand, an extra matinee performance has already been added to the Hippodrome run at 2pm on Friday 21 March.

The production, which features, “half a mile of flexible pipe work, and a 10 tonne water tank and a water system that creates a downpour from above and flooding from below the stage,” and uses over 12,000 litres of water per performance, is directed by Jonathan Church, who served as artistic director of the Birmingham REP from 2001-06. Starring in the show will be James Leece and Amy Ellen Richardson as lovers Don Lockwood and Kathy Selden, Stephane Anelli as sidekick Cosmo Brown, Steps singer Faye Tozer as demanding starlet Lina Lamont, and international stage and screen star Maxwell Caulfield as studio boss R. F. Simpson.

Said Rob McPherson, the Hippodrome’s Director of Marketing and Development:

Singin’ in the Rain is one of musical theatre’s classic masterpieces and it’s great to see that the show is as popular now as it ever has been. Due to a downpour of public demand we are pleased to announce an extra matinee performance in order to allow as many sitr tour-334 DG editpeople of Birmingham the chance to dig out their umbrellas and join us in the days of Hollywood gone by – we are looking forward to seeing those who will be braving the ‘splash zone’ in the front few rows…”

To get some exclusive behind the scenes insights from star of the show Max Caulfield, check out the latest Hippodrome podcast here. Plus, for a chance to win some extra special Singin’ in the Rain goodies, follow @brumhippodrome on Twitter and send us a picture of yourself singing in the rain. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #BHSingin!

Singin’ in the Rain is showing at the Birmingham Hippodrome from Tuesday 18th March until Saturday 5th April. Tickets are priced from £16-45 with some £5 First Night seats available for those aged 16-23. You can book via the Birmingham Hippodrome website, or by calling 0844 338 5000. If you’re using the First Night scheme, don’t forget to tell us what you think here.

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Following this, a brand new musical based on the classic TV series Happy Days will be making its UK premiere at the theatre, featuring all the original characters as they battle to save their diner Arnold’s from demolition.

(L-R) Cheryl Baker as Mrs Cunningham, Ben Freeman as The Fonz, Heidi Range as Pinky Tuscadero in Happy Days - A New Musical (Photo Paul Coltas)Happy Days – A New Musical is written by Garry Marshall, creator of the original show and director of many hit feature films including Beaches, Pretty Woman and The Princess Diaries. In addition to the Happy Days theme  tune, it will feature 21 brand new songs by Bugsy Malone composer and Oscar, Grammy and Golden Globe award-winning songwriter Paul Williams.

Starring in the show will be Emmerdale’s Ben Freeman as The Fonz, Sugababes singer Heidi Range as Pinky Tuscadero and Bucks Fizz’s Cheryl Baker as Mrs Cunningham. Choreography is by Andrew Wright, who also choreographed the current tour of Singin’ in the Rain, while original “Fonz” Henry Winkler will act as Creative Consultant. Amy Anzel, who featured in recent Channel 4 documentary The Sound of Musicals, is producing.

Happy Days – A New Musical will be showing at the Birmingham Hippodrome from Tuesday 22nd until Saturday 26th April. Tickets are priced from £15-37 and can be booked from the Birmingham Hippodrome website, or by calling 0844 338 5000. If you are aged 16-25 and are purchasing £5 First Night tickets, please give us your thoughts here.

Birmingham Literature Festival: 8-12 October 2013

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carol-ann-duffy-portrait-300x199Celebrations in honour of the new Library of Birmingham will continue over the next few days with the return of the similarly re-designed Birmingham Literature Festival (formerly Birmingham Book Festival). To coincide with National Poetry Day, the festival kicks off tomorrow with the announcement of the city’s new poet laureate, alongside readings from previous bearers of the title. Following this, acclaimed poets Carol Ann Duffy and Imtiaz Dharker will be performing their work in the library’s studio.Imtiaz

The festival lasts until 12th October, featuring a whole host of exciting guests including Germaine Greer, Benjamin Zephaniah, Will Self, Shami Chakrabarti, Lionel Shriver, Jonathan Coe and Stuart Maconie, as well an interesting mix of local writers and their work. There will also be a series of writing workshops, covering a whole host of subjects from children’s Germaine-Greer-252x300animation, to poetry in translation, and from sci-fi and horror genre writing to maximising your productivity as a writer. On Sunday 6th October, BBC Radio 4 will be attending, bringing Poetry Please and With Great Pleasure to live Birmingham audiences, with appearances from poets Roger McGough and Paul Farley.

Benjamin-Zephaniah1-for-website-300x225On Wednesday 9th, a group of writers shortlisted for this year’s Man Booker Prize will be reading from their work and answering audience questions in the studio theatre, and on Friday 11th, you can catch a rehearsed reading of Alan Bennett‘s lost television play, Denmark Hill, a black comedy set in South East London. The performance is organised by the Birmingham REP, and will finish with a Q&A session with director Tristram Powell.

Roger-McGough-Poetry-PleaseIf you’re strapped for cash, there are plenty of free events taking place throughout the festival, including the aforementioned Radio 4 recordings. On Sunday 6th, you can join West Midlands storytellers for Tell Me On a Sunday at the Ikon Gallery, and on Tueday 8th, Wednesday 9th and Saturday 12th, you can attend launch events for brand new anthologies of poetry, fiction and art.

will-self-credit-polly-boland-237x300It’s great to see the West Midlands continuing to celebrate arts and culture on both national and local levels. Let’s hope the festival gets as good a turn-out as the Four Squares Weekender!

NB: Look out for me in a bright pink t-shirt if you’re around on Tuesday 8th, Thursday 10th or Friday 11th!

4 Squares Weekender – Birmingham Celebrates Art and Culture

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There are honestly few sights I’ve seen more cheering than the enormous crowds that turned out for the 4 Squares arts festival in Birmingham last weekend. Even if the crazy-long queues for the library meant that I couldn’t get into the building to take a look around myself (don’t worry, I’ll be back), I couldn’t help but feel thrilled to see so many people getting so excited about a library – and more generally, across the city centre, to see so many people actively engaging with the arts. I’ve since been told that an estimated 95,000 people were there this weekend, with well over half of those having made a special journey for the event. It’s not a surprise at all. As Christopher Barron, Chief Executive of the Birmingham Royal Ballet, said:

“4 Squares Weekender proved, as if it were needed, the appetite of Birmingham audiences for high quality, spectacular and accessible cultural experiences.”

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Just as exciting as the size and scale of this event, though, was its scope. With almost every major arts organisation in the city offering some kind of contribution, it’s little wonder that it attracted crowds every bit as diverse as its performances. The wonderful thing about putting everything together in one place, of course, is that people were encouraged to step out of their comfort zones and try out something new. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen such a range of arts and audiences manage to be so wholly integrated. Where else but here could you see old men and women, toddlers and teenagers of all races enjoying outdoor opera side-by-side and equally as much? Where else would you find adult men actively volunteering to participate in a ballet demonstration? Where else could you see the disparate stories of a rich-man turned homeless and a bulimic young woman effortlessly combined into a single fairy tale, told straight to the faces of a tiny audience packed into a caravan, decorated simultaneously as both a food bank and an allotment?

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Without wittering on any further, then, I’ll give you a quick breakdown of the things that I managed to see – though I’m afraid there was plenty that I didn’t. Obviously I’m hinting here that I’d like the chance to see the rest again – come on, Birmingham!

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Friday night was the official festival launch and, having arrived a little early for the press reception in advance of the show, I headed up to Victoria Square to take a look at the huge crane and moveable stage that would form part of the evening’s performance of As the World Tipped. Arriving there, I unexpectedly came across performance that had already started: a brilliant little group called Trio Damba, made up of three members of Birmingham band, The Destroyers, with Louis Robinson at the helm. According to the programme, their musical style is an unusual blend of “genres as diverse as Klezma, Hot Club, Tango, Country and Western and Fraggle Rock”. Later that weekend, I was to see them again with support from additional musicians.

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The evening’s main event, As the World Tipped, was a little slow in starting. Sound effects announcing the beginning of the show were started up a good twenty minutes before anything actually happened, and there were other areas of the show that would have benefitted from some cutting down (the list of endangered species, for example, and the drawn-out ending). Yet the action and stunts were faultless and spectacular – this was definitely a way to get things started with a bang, and the crowds loved it.

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I started Saturday with a ceilidh. There are few ways I’d rather spend my Saturday afternoons, given the choice. I had one at my wedding recently, and I’m rather of the opinion that mass outdoor dances should be implemented as a regular thing in cities every weekend. The novelty would never wear off, and sedentary arty types like me would all be an awful lot fitter as a result. This was an unusual sort of ceilidh in that it was quite stripped back to ensure that the little ones could get the most out of it. The Burdock Ceilidh Band even invented their own new dance called War and Peace (the abridged version), which seemed to mainly involve pulling silly faces at the people in the line facing your own. Everyone who was there had great fun, 25708_swhether or not they joined in themselves. After this, I headed out towards the Town Hall to catch a brief ballet show, but with time to spare, I stopped off at the stage in Chamberlain Square to pick up some dance moves from the mac’s Move Me workshop.

Birmingham Royal Ballet Presents…, it transpired, was less a ballet performance and more an insight into the rehearsal process and how a ballet production is put together, run by Assistant Director Marion Tait, Ballerina Callie Roberts and Pianist Matthew Drury. Callie is currently preparing to play the wicked fairy Carabosse in The Sleeping Beauty, which will be showing at the Birmingham Hippodrome from 8-12th October. Members of the audience were asked to stand in for the King, Queen and Catalabutte, the master-of-ceremonies who forgets to invite Carabosse. It was really fascinating to get a glimpse into this process, to see that even the most 300accomplished of performers have lots to learn before they get up in front of an audience.

After this, I headed back to Centenary Square for the Secret Drama at 2pm, with enough time to catch a little of three different performances. At the Musical PicnicLouis Robinson and Friends finished off a set, while over towards the Paradise Forum, colourfully costumed dancers showed off their moves in the Hooray for Bollywood! show. Meanwhile, The Russians Are Coming…. took place in the new library’s open amphitheatre, featuring fantastic Birmingham Opera Company baritone Byron Jackson performing four songs involving personifications of Death, accompanied by Sergey Rybin on piano.

The Secret Drama was a wordless, energetic, five-minute show, announced by a gong right behind me, which almost made me jump out of my skin! The performance involved fire engine ladders, abseiling, a skateboard, a police car and a giant key. What was it about? Well, it wouldn’t be a secret if I told you now, would it?

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Following this, the CBSO Cello Ensemble assembled at the Musical Picnic stage to perform Notelets, a family-friendly show that got little ones joining in with familiar songs like “Twinkle Twinkle” and the theme tune from In the Night Garden. Simultaneously, Ex Cathedra entered the amphitheatre for a gorgeous rendition of a series of songs inspired by nature, rounded off with an a capella version of “Singin’ in the Rain” – fortunately not actually in the rain. I was a little disappointed that I couldn’t find the promised CBSO Wind Ensemble, but there was more than enough to keep me occupied until I went off to queue up for my first Eat! experience.

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Eat! is a series of four intimate, 15-minute dramas, performed inside gutted and redecorated caravans to tiny audiences of 15. Each vignette is based on true stories gathered from interviews and online conversations with local people conducted in advance by the REP. Naturally, the caravans filled up quickly, so to be in with a chance of seeing any of the shows, one had to arrive a good quarter of an hour or so before the start. The first I saw remained my favourite of them all. This was the show I mention above, telling the stories of a fairy tale princess who lived with a wise old man (or an overweight teenager who lived with her grandfather), and a knight in shining armour who became bewitched by a magic potion (or a rich, smart-suited guy who became an alcoholic after being left by his wife).

800x600.fitdownSadly, this was the last thing I got chance to see on Saturday, but I’m told by the good authority that is the Twittersphere that Musical Youth were superb.

Sunday kicked off with a journey to the East through musical storytelling from Michael Loader at the musical picnic stand, enjoyed by children and grown-ups alike. This was followed by Metropolitan Brass, a brass-five piece who played familiar, family-friendly tunes including the themes from The Simpsons, Harry Potter and The Pink Panther.

My second Eat! experience, also in Centenary Square, was much more lively and upbeat than the first. This caravan combined singing, beatboxing and heightened theatricals to run through a series of food-related snapshots, rather than one or two full stories. To fit with the show’s “theatre” theme, the inside was decorated in rich red and gold colours, with heavy curtains surrounded by an ornate arch. I couldn’t help but wonder what will happen to all these beautiful sets now that it’s all over – I hope that the company at least get to extend their tour.

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After this, I aimed for the Victoria Square Eat! show, but failed to make it on time, so I headed over to Oozells Square to check out Clayground Collective‘s giant clay city and the other Eat! show. Before I’d gone very far, however, I encountered a crowd in the middle of the ICC, surrounding a band which turned out to be the energetic and experimental Perhaps Contraption. The volume level in the corridor soon led to a collective decision to take the show outside, and I followed them out to listen to a couple of songs.

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Conscious of time however, I wasn’t able to stick around for too long if I wanted to catch the next caravan perfomance, so I pressed on, arriving with just enough time to listen to a rendition of Jessie J’s “Money” by the Occasional Brass Band just outside the square.

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The Clayground Collective activity was something beautiful to see, with hordes of children gathered round to unleash their creativity. The “war” themed Eat! production was beautiful too, but in a very different, much more poignant way. The show told a haunting wartime tale of suffering, starvation and survival against the odds, inside a caravan kitted-out with seats made of books and walls plastered with printed pages. “There are friends, and there is food,” the story began, “but food is your best friend.” This caravan, too, suggested one possible answer to the question of what would happen to the sets next – it would be lovely to see this bookish set as a permanent installation in or around the new library….

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Back in Centenary Square, the CBSO String Quartet were due to start at the same time – and in the same place, it turned out – as a repeat of the Birmingham Opera Company‘s performance from the day before.  Unable to find the string quartet, I caught a little of the CBSO Cello Ensemble and The Russians Are Coming… before settling down at the musical picnic to listen to Soweto Kinch‘s bizarre blend of jazz and hip hop. Soweto free-styled impressively, using words thrown at him by the audience to go with each of the letter in “music”. The “i” was for “intellectual”, and with all the wit and Latin words being rattled off here, it seemed apt enough. Soweto Kinch will be performing his show, The Legend of Mike Smith at the Birmingham REP from 12-28 September – I’m definitely going to try to catch it there!

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Before seeing the final Eat! production in Victoria Square, there was time at this point to enjoy some impressive circus skills displays from NoFit State, and some soul and motown classics from the Brothers of Soul and Divas of Soul in The Magic of Old Skool Classics.

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The final Eat! show followed a wedding theme, telling the story of a woman who “live[d] to eat“, and describing the food at her weddings to multiple husbands from around the world. Despite her larger-than-life cheeriness, however, there was a subtle, half-hidden sadness in the tale: our protagonist, we learn, is a recovered anorexic, with a secret sense of loss clouding her past.

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Last but not least was Tippa Irie, reggae legend taking over the Simmer Down stage outside the Town Hall. A troop of loyal supporters swarmed round for his set, willing to stick it out even when the heavens opened above them.

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4 Squares Weekender, I think, perfectly represented the West Midlands at it’s best, and perhaps for the first time, I felt truly proud to be a part of it. As Peter Knott, Director of Arts Council England, put it:

“4 Squares Weekender was an iconic opportunity for Birmingham to welcome visitors and locals alike, showing off the world class cultural offer in the City and heralding a new way of working which places the Library at the heart of this community.”

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Suddenly, it seems like a thoroughly exciting time to be in Birmingham and the surrounding area, and I join with Christopher Barron in hoping that “the launch of the new Library, the re-opening of The REP and 4 Squares Weekender are not the end of the story.”

4 Squares Weekender – Free Theatre to Launch the New Library of Birmingham

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If you’ve been following the news this week, you may well have spotted that the new Library of Birmingham was opened on Tuesday by Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who survived being shot by the Taliban for championing girls’ rights to education.

Speaking on the day, Malala described books as weapons for beating terrorism, claiming that “the only way to global peace is reading, knowledge and education”. With characteristic eloquence, she went on to explain that,

“Books are precious. Some books travel with you back centuries, others take you into the future. Some take you to the core of your heart and others take you into the universe. […] It is written that a room without books is like a body without a soul. A city without a library is like a graveyard.”

Malala also spoke about the importance of Birmingham as a city, describing it as “the beating heart of England“.

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Following on from this official launch, a weekend of free live performance across Birmingham City Centre will celebrate the library’s opening, beginning at 9.30pm tomorrow with As the World Tipped, a spectacular, aerial outdoor show by Wired Aerial Theatre, set on a huge 12 metre screen against the night sky. Watch this space for updates: I’ll be attending and reporting back on both the show and the media launch beforehand. If you can’t make it tomorrow, the performance will be repeated at 9pm on Saturday.

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Across Saturday and Sunday, you’ll be able to see a diverse range of shows taking place across Birmingham’s Oozells, Centenary, Chamberlain and Victoria Squares, with something for all ages to enjoy. In the words of Peter Knott, Regional Director of Arts Council England, 4 Squares Weekender is, “a spectacular weekend to celebrate arts and culture”, offering “something to suit all tastes”.

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In Oozells Square and Brindleyplace, there’ll be a series of performances and activities organised by mac Birmingham. Inside Ikon’s galleries, there will be music by the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group and the Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, as well as dance from Sampad and contemporary circus by Pif-Paf. Outside, you can take part in family-friendly activities, helping to build a giant city out of clay.

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A musical picnic will take place in Centenary Square, courtesy of Town Hall Symphony Hall, and featuring performances from Birmingham-based saxophonist Soweto Kinch. Meanwhile, inside four converted caravans, the Birmingham REP will be providing impromptu acting and storytelling, and inside the new library itself, there’ll be music from Ex Cathedra and the Birmingham Opera Company.

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TippaIrie2013In Victoria Square, NoFit State Circus will be providing performance and circus skills taster workshops. If you missed them at Summer in Southside, this is a great chance to catch up with their incredible acrobatics, as well as to take part and learn some skills yourself!

Finally, in Chamberlain Square, The Drum’s Simmer Down stage will be hosting a range of reggae, ska, bhangra, sufi and hip-hop music, including performances from Tippa Irie and Musical Youth. Inside the Town Hall, you’ll be able to see dance performances from the Birmingham Royal Ballet and DanceXchange, including opportunities to take part, while the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery will be presenting a full day of film courtesy of Flatpack Festival.

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Said Stuart Griffiths, Chief Executive of the Birmingham Hippodrome, “”Birmingham’s arts organisations offer some of the most vibrant and exciting programmes in the country. We are delighted to come together to welcome the new Library of Birmingham at this incredibly exciting time for our city.”

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If you’re attending, don’t forget to tell us about your experiences on Twitter, using the hashtag #bham4sq. As with the Summer in Southside festival, I’ll be hanging around over both days, so check back here if you’re curious about anything you don’t manage to attend.

Hope to see you there!

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