Have You Bean to Brum? Jack and the Beanstalk: The Birmingham Hippodrome Panto 2014

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Another year, another hilarious Hippodrome panto – it’s hard to believe that Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was so long ago, but here we are again.

DSCF3552This Christmas, Jack and the Beanstalk sees its murderous giant brought to life in stunning 3D by Whizzbang 3D Productions before a squealing audience. On press night at least, there were also a few squeals of a rather different sort directed at the show’s leading man, Blue’s Duncan James. Assisting the wicked giant is the slimy, treacherous Fleshcreep, played by Coronation Street‘s Chris Gascoyne, looking excellent in a sweeping black coat, top hat, shades and thick eyeliner. Meanwhile, helping out our hero on the good team are Jane McDonald’s glamorous Enchantress and returning comedy trio Gary Wilmot, Paul Zerdin and Matt Slack, as Jack’s mum, Dame Trot, and his two bonkers brothers, Simple Simon and Silly Billy.

As ever, the show is an absolute visual feast – and not just because it features enough beans to feed a family for weeks and a comedy routine centred on the names of different chocolate bars. Stunning sets, beautiful backdrops and gorgeous, glittering lights are all in abundance, while the fabulous array of costumes includes the Enchantress’s dazzling dress, Fleshcreep’s gothic get-up and a whole host of fluffy farm animals who gallop, trot and pad across the stage for a charming dance sequence with the Dame. As well as the giant, the special effects also encompass a beanstalk so tall it looks as though it might topple (don’t worry – no audience members were harmed in the staging of this performance, as far as we know), and an amazing helicopter and animatronic giant that operate with a similar mechanism to last year’s Black Country dragon.

DSCF3526Throughout the show, there’s a brilliant chemistry between Jane McDonald’s and Chris Gascoyne’s constantly clashing helper characters, and Wilmot, Zerdin and Slack are back on form, bouncing off each other and providing the driving energy behind this production. There are some great set pieces in Act I, including the aforementioned chocolate bars skit, some well-timed slapstick from Silly Billy, and a couple of nice moments with Simple Simon and his cheeky puppet, Sam. However, it’s in the second half that the comedy really picks up, with a hysterical 12 Days of Christmas routine which last night saw one viewer almost knocked out by flying loo rolls. Up in the giant’s castle, Dame Trot and her boys keep up their spirits with a rendition of “All About That Bass”, and the end of the show features some audience participation when Paul Zerdin invites some of the little ones up onto the stage for a sing-song – and, of course, some human ventriloquism.

But the gags aren’t the only thing guaranteed to have you leaving the theatre with a smile on your face: brilliantly choreographed, the big dance numbers to the classic “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” and Pharrell’s irresistible “Happy” will have you grinning and humming along whether or not you mean to.

Once again, Michael Harrison and Qdos bring you panto at its finest. Oh yes they do.

Jack and the Beanstalk is showing at the Birmingham Hippodrome until Sunday 1st February, with a special relaxed performance on Thursday 29th January. For more information and to book tickets, visit the Hippodrome website, and don’t forget to watch out for a Radio 2 broadcast about Britain’s biggest pantomime on Christmas Day.

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Oh no they didn’t! Jane McDonald and the Hippodrome Panto Stars Begin Rehearsals in London

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It’s December, and with panto season well underway, rehearsals for the UK’s biggest pantomime have just begun, with the stars of this year’s show, Jack and the Beanstalk, getting into character in London’s Jerwood Space.

Yesterday, members of the press were invited to sit in on some of the first read- and dance-throughs. Although we caught the cast early on in their rehearsal process, from the short scenes we saw, it was clear that both the comedy and choreography were already taking shape.

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First up, we got a glimpse of the opening dance number, with the chorus getting jamming along to Pharell’s ‘Happy’. Next, Jane McDonald (The Cruise, Loose Women, Star Treatment) and Chris Gascoyne (Coronation Street, New Street Law, Soldier Soldier) took to the floor to face off in their respective roles as The Enchantress and the Giant’s assistant, Fleshcreep. Returning for his second Hippodrome panto running, ventriloquist Paul Zerdin (who plays Simple Simon) and his puppet, Sam, then rehearsed a scene involving a complicated gag centred around the names of three neighbours. Zerdin was later joined by returning comedy co-stars Gary Wilmot (Dame Trot) and Matt Slack (Silly Billy) as well as Blue’s Duncan James (Jack), who discussed the hard times the family had fallen upon, and made a good early attempt at some very complicated lines! Finally, a second dance sequence ended with a number from TV songster Jane McDonald.

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After lunch, I had chance to interview some of the stars about their roles in the show. Here’s what Jane McDonald had to say about The Enchantress.

Tell me a bit about your character in the panto.

My character is The Enchantress and she is the magic spirit of all that is good. I come in and fix everybody’s lives and make sure that nobody gets hurt and that the love is shared all around. So it’s the perfect role for me, really!

You’ve not long started, but how are the rehearsals going so far?

No, we’ve only been doing it for two days, but I have never laughed so much! The cast are the funniest people I have ever met in my life! I’m really looking forward to it now. I’ve never done panto before – this is my first time – and a lot of people have said it’s hard work, but to be quite honest, I go out and do my own shows for two and a half hours every night, so to actually work with a cast is a lifesaver for me! I’m also looking forward to being in the same place every day and sleeping in the same bed every night. That’ll be complete luxury!

DSCF3412Sounds like the tour has left you feeling worn out!

You could say that, yeah! I only finished on Sunday night and then it was straight into the first rehearsal on Monday, so I’m at the stage where I’m not sure how I’m even managing to talk to you right now! But it has been fabulous fun, and you just keep going in this business.

This is your first pantomime, but it won’t be your first stage musical, so how does it compare to other things that you’ve worked on in the past?

I did Romeo and Juliet in the West End, which was very dark, so this is obviously much lighter! It’s very camp and very funny. The script is hilarious. Even my opening line is about my knickers coming off! When I first read it, I thought, “Blimey, that’s a bit much!” But it is funny. It’s all typical English humour, which we don’t see a lot of, nowadays.

I think I caught sight of your magic wand earlier on. Have you had chance to try your costume on and see how everything looks yet?

How heavy is that wand?

I think it’s about half the size of me!

Ha, it is, actually! It’s massive, isn’t it? And it lights up and does everything. I think you can probably see it from space! It is very heavy, so I’m going to have to get used to handling it. It’s phenomenal though. It’s got its own credit, that wand.

How about the dress? Have you had a look at that?

Yeah, it’s lovely. Lots of Lycra! So that’ll give me a bit of breathing space – built-in underwear, that’s me. It’s actually very easy to wear.

And sparkly, I bet.

Yeah, of course it is!

That doesn’t light up as well, does it?

No – not yet! That’s an idea, though!

DSCF3398[1]You’ve previously worked with Duncan on Loose Women. How has it been reuniting with him in a different context?

Yeah, we’ve done a couple of shows together. It’s great, actually. You get to know people a lot better when you’re doing something like this, because we’re going to be working together for eight weeks. He’s a cracking singer, you know. When he started up singing in the rehearsals, I was like, “Blimey!” He’s got a really strong voice, and he’s a great actor as well, so I think it’s good for him to be doing this in his own right.  I think a lot of people will be impressed. I was certainly wowed when I saw him, even though I’d seen him in the West End before so I already knew he could do it. He’s hilarious, too – not at all like his character. He’s very very funny and very dry.

Have you had chance to have a look at the theatre yet or will it all be new to you when you arrive there?

I went over to have a look and to do the press day before, and it’s absolutely stunning! The Birmingham Hippodrome is like the place to perform. Apparently everybody’s coming to this place and everyone comes to watch the Birmingham panto, so I’m hoping they’ll all come and see this one – otherwise it’s not going to reflect very well on me! I must admit I’d go and see a show there. It’s a very comfortable theatre. It has really nice seats and fantastic views. I’m really looking forward to performing there.

What about Birmingham more generally. Do you know the town much?

You’ve got everything there, haven’t you? Selfridges and all the shopping. I’m well excited!

So has starting the panto rehearsals put you in the Christmas spirit or have you resisted the festive pull so far?

I think I’ve avoided it a bit, just because I haven’t really had time to think about it. But all the adverts on telly are starting to get me now. I think once I’m in Birmingham that’s when I’ll start to feel really festive. I’ll have my partner there and my mum will come to visit, and my best friend. I think it’s gonna be lovely!

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Jack and the Beanstalk will be showing at the Birmingham Hippodrome from Friday 19th December until Sunday 1st February. Tickets are available from the Birmingham Hippodrome website. Keep an eye on this blog for my interviews with panto co-stars Matt Slack and Gary Wilmot

I’m Dreaming of a Snow White Christmas…. The Hippodrome’s 2013 Christmas Panto

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Nothing says Christmas quite like a panto – other than, perhaps, being shocked out of your skin by a man in a Christmas tree costume, but I shall say no more on that. Packed full of magic, music and mischief, the country’s biggest and best professional pantomime never fails to leave audiences full of festive cheer, and this year was no exception.

JS26360892-6379573Beginning with the descent of a sparkling, silver-clad Gok Wan from a magic mirror suspended in the air, the spectacle was superb throughout, with vibrant, colourful costumes, expertly choreographed dance sequences and some breathtaking special effects, including an enormous, terrifying dragon from the darkest, deadliest depths of the Black Country. The show’s many sets were also incredible, seamlessly shifting from one elaborate backdrop to another.

Of course, at it’s heart, pantomime is all about the comedy, and here it was laid on as thick as Dame Nora Crumble’s make-up by Gary Wilmot, Paul Zerdin and Matt Slack as the Dame and her hapless, lovesick sons Muddles and Oddjob. First and foremost a comedian, Slack really stole the show, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Birmingham Hippodrome. 23rd Sepleaving the audience howling with his slapstick and one-liners. Meanwhile ventriloquist Paul Zerdin built up the humour over longer routines, often involving a lot of audience participation, as in one almost unbearably funny scene where two viewers were called up onto the stage and left at the puppet-master’s mercy. As for the Dame herself, Wilmot excelled at the musical comedy, with a rousing number extolling local Brummie curry dish, balti, and a lovely singing voice that lent itself well to a more sentimental song about motherhood. The highlight of the show, though, was a lightning-speed musical bit packed full of physical comedy and involving all three members of the little family as well as Man in the Mirror Gok Wan: by the end of it, even Gok himself couldn’t keep a straight face, bursting into a fit of uncontrollable giggles.

snow white 2013 4Though this was his first foray into the world of acting, Gok was, as ever, charming and brilliant, showing off his moves in his own mirror-themed musical number (#FABULOUS!). Equally fabulous in her own way was Stephanie Beacham as the wicked Queen Sadista. Though perhaps not quite the fairest in the land, the glamorous villainess could certainly give most a run for their money, and of her dazzling outfits it was impossible not to be “well jeal”.

Towards the end, her transformation into the old crone was a properly spooky, Hammer-esque moment, featuring a strange,  ghostly figure floating above the stage. And as if that wasn’t enough for your Christmas ghost story fix, an appearance is also put in at one point by a mysterious headless horseman….

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Birmingham Hippodrome. 23rd SepOne general criticism is that less time was spent with the lead characters than might normally be expected, and the story itself was mostly secondary to the comic set pieces. All told, though, it mattered little, since it’s such an energetic and entertaining production that whatever’s lacking in traditional storytelling is more than made up for elsewhere. Without giving too much away, it was especially interesting to see a new take on the story’s ending with the Queen facing a rather unusual fate.

Overall then, a triumph once again. If you haven’t quite got into the festive spirit yet, then a trip to see this show should be just the ticket!

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is showing at the Birmingham Hippodrome until Sunday 2nd February 2014. Don’t forget to check out Gok Does Panto at 7:05pm on Monday 30th December for a look behind the scenes. You might even catch a glimpse of me at the rehearsals in the Jerwood Space in London!

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Top photo by Tal Fox. Check out her blog here.

Feeling Festive – A Day at the Hippodrome Panto Rehearsals with Cast Interviews

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As Christmas draws ever closer, the Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs panto cast is beginning to get into the festive spirit with rehearsals for the show, which will open at the Hippodrome later this month. Along with a handful of journalists, I joined a coach trip down to London for a special behind-the-scenes look at how things are going so far. Just three days into rehearsals, it’s already looking fantastic, with the promise of even more spectacle, singing and surprises still in store.

After arriving at the rehearsal space, we were first treated to a few snippets of the show, beginning with a musical number featuring John Partridge as Prince John, along with an impressive group of dancers. This first scene takes place at the beginning of Act 2, with the Prince assembling an army to go in search of Snow White (Danielle Hope), who has been captured by her stepmother, Queen Sadista (Stephanie Beacham).

The second excerpt featured the wicked Queen herself, calling upon the Man in the Magic Mirror (Gok Wan), to reassure her of her beauty after she discovers that the dashing Prince John is a long-lost childhood friend of her “uber-cute stepdaughter”, Snow. As Stephanie Beacham hammed it up as the dastardly drama Queen, Gok Wan “flew in” with perfect comic timing, interrupting her preening with deadpan put-downs.

Finally came a scene featuring our heroine Snow White, alongside the Dame’s son and secret Snow admirer, Muddles (ventriloquist Paul Zerdin). During the play, Muddles competes for Snow’s love with his brother Oddjob (Matt Slack). In the scene we were shown, Muddles uses his puppet pal to help him tell Snow White how he feels about her.

Following this, the cast gave interviews and I teamed up with Paul Hadsley from The Bridge radio in Birmingham to speak to John Partridge, Gary Wilmot (The Dame) and Danielle Hope. Transcriptions from the interviews are below. At some point, the audios should be going out on The Bridge Radio – more info on this when it arrives!

BapGXjZIYAA0kxv.jpg largeAn Interview with John Partridge

PH: You’re a serious actor who’s had many serious roles. Is this where you have some fun and let off some steam?

JP: We do have fun, but make no bones about it, panto is a very, very serious business. There are no shaky sets or dodgy costumes: this is a multi-million pound production in every sense. We play 12 shows a week, and if you didn’t have seasoned professionals who were able to handle that type of schedule….you know, we’ve got no understudies in panto so if you’re sick, there’s a problem. You have to take it very seriously. Of course there’s the winking and the nodding to the audience but everything is in it’s place. It may look off the cuff but it is rehearsed and drilled and we only have 10 days to put all of that together. It is great fun, don’t get me wrong. We all do it because it’s fun, but it is also a very serious business at the same time.

PH: So, after you’ve said all that, we know that Gok Wan will be joining you on stage. All I’ve heard so far has been fantastic praise for him, being thrown into this world for the first time, with people saying he’s doing really well. Is that right based on what you’ve seen?

JP: I think that what Qdos do so well when they put these shows together is that they make things very collaborative with everybody bringing to the table what they do best. Somebody asked me before if I had any tips for Gok and I said, “I don’t need to give Gok any tips because panto is all about making an audience feel good and that’s what Gok does for a living – he makes an audience feel good about themselves and this is no different.” Everything that each of us does individually we bring to the table here. So, you know, Stephanie’s here for your dramatic art and Gok’s here to chat to the audience. I’m here to do showstopping numbers. Everybody’s actually in their “box”, for want of a better word. He’s gonna do great, he has a natural rapport with the audience and that’s basically what pantomime is, so he’s already winning.

HK: What’s been your favourite scene to rehearse so far?

JP: Well, obviously we’re only about three quarters of the way through and we haven’t finished the end yet. I always love the end because we have a rule in panto which is that you never perfom the last scene until the first show because it’s bad luck, so that’s the first time you do it and I always love waiting for that scene because, you never know: something might go wrong in that bit. I do have a couple of scenes with Stephanie and I have to say, I’m a huge Stephanie fan. I just think that for somebody like Stephanie to be appearing in a show like this – somebody who’s been at the Royal Court, who’s been in Hollywood, who’s had such a breadth of experience on both stage and screen – for me, it is an honour to play scenes with her and I relish all the moments I have on stage with her. On the first day of rehearsals, she came in in a full-length fur and I was like, “There you go, Miss Hollywood!” A bit of Hollywood’s coming to Birmingham and I love all of that. It’s just great. And that’s the other thing, you know, ‘cos panto can sometimes get a bad rep but you’ve got celebrity Big Brother if you wish to go and die now so you don’t come and do it in panto.

HK: Obviously you’re not able to tell us everything at the moment, but have there been any big surprises reading the script? Any diversions from the traditional Snow White story?

JP: There are no big diversions from the traditional Snow White story but I love it when I get a script from Michael Harrison, because basically there’s nothing in it. You know, you get the script, and you know it’s gonna be nothing like that by the time it comes to the show, and then they start saying, “Oh, you don’t mind if they do this, do you, John?” Erm…. And, “Oh, you don’t mind if this happens, do you, John?” Hmmm… So, there are a couple of moments – and I actually will be looking forward to it – where I really send myself up, and they’re not on the page. You suddenly think, “What have I let myself in for?” But it is gonna be great!

HK: Have you done much panto before?

JP: This is my third panto, and somebody described me as a “panto veteran”, but some of these guys here have done, like, 10, 12, 13 of them so I’m still…almost virgin-like. Not quite, but almost (it’s nice to be a virgin at something at 42, that’s what I say)! But yeah, I’ve done three before and I loved all of them so I’m very much looking forward to this one. I’ve been at the Birmingham Hippodrome before: I was here in about 2005 with Miss Saigon and I was in the old theatre, way back in about ’96, I think it was, so I’m very much looking forward to coming back. It’s great to be at the Birmingham Hippodrome because they have such a great crew there, who know what they’re doing, which is great for us because when you’ve only got such a short amount of time to put a show on, it’s great that everyone else around you knows what they’re doing even if you don’t! We will, by the time we get there, but it just takes that pressure off you when you’ve got such an experienced theatre staff there looking after you. It really makes a difference.

HK: I have to ask – have you enjoyed wearing the prince costume?

JP: I love my prince costumes, even though they keep trying to push me into tights and I won’t wear ’em. I don’t like the junk on display, not at my age! But yeah, I love my prince costumes, especially my prince shoes. I’ve got fabulous shoes that are made especially for me: gorgeous, gold, high-heeled, buckle-up shoes!

HK: You’re gonna be looking for fashion advice from Gok soon!

BapE7O3IQAARGCL.jpg largeJP: (laughing) Listen, you wait till you see what he’s wearing! I won’t be taking any fashion advice from him!

PH: Just one last question: pantomime is obviously a Christmassy thing, but you’ll be carrying on past Christmas, won’t you? So how are you going to keep the Christmas spirit alive into mid-January?

JP: Darling, we wish to keep the Christmas spirit alive past January and beyond! So for us, well, I’ll just keep slapping that thigh until somebody tells me not to!

An Interview with Danielle Hope

PH: Have you been to Birmingham before?

DH: I have, I’ve been once before, we did a press launch for the show, when I went for the day there and it’s amazing. I’m really excited to be spending Christmas there. Being Northern, it’s nice for me because I’ll be halfway between home and London, which is great.

PH: Did you have any trouble finding your way around? Because I’ve heard quite a few people saying they got a bit lost.

DH: (laughing) Yes, it’s huge! All the streets are amazing but they all look the same. I was running up and down the shops and I couldn’t find anything, but two wonderful people showed me the way to the theatre, so thank you to that couple!

PH: People may remember you from Over the Rainbow, and you’ve had some serious acting roles, so is doing panto a chance to have fun and let go, or is this a big challenge itself?

DH: I think this is actually a challenge in a completely different respect because panto is such a different beast and you have to approach it in a different way. It’s on a huge scale! When I did Les Mis, for example, it was in quite an intimate space, whereas this has got to be able to read from all the way over there (gesturing far away). So yeah, it will be a challenge in a different way.

HK: Do you get much of a chance to use your lovely singing voice in this production?

DH: Yes indeed! I’m getting my Disney on! I’m gonna be singing a song that I’ve sung before and that’s all I’m saying.

HK: How are the rehearsals going so far? Is it all going well?

DH: Yeah, really well! I mean, we’re on day three and we’ve almost finished the whole thing. For me on stage there’s usually about three weeks where we move through and we’re all like “Oh gosh!”, but with this we’re on day three and we’ve nearly finished it already! It’s amazing, we’re moving so fast! And then we get a week and a half to get it all fleshed out and then we’ll go back and run it and run it and run it.

PH: Is that a normal time frame for this kind of thing?

DH: For a pantomime apparently you get about a week to a week and a half but usually for any other shows you get about three weeks so it’s all condensed.

PH: Do you think it’ll be better in the early stages while you’re still working things out or later, once you’ve perfected it a bit?

DH: I think it’s like anything – it evolves naturally, doesn’t it? I think it will develop and change but I’m quite excited about that. The more different things you find, the longer you can keep doing it.

HK: Do you have a favourite scene that you’ve worked on so far?

DH: I think all my scenes with John, my prince, are probably my favourite, when we’re dueting. It’s all very lovely and very romantic!

HK: Has he been good to work with?

DH: Oh yeah, amazing! I mean, obviously I know John from doing Over the Rainbow but getting to work with him on stage is lovely.

PH: You get to judge him on his performance! It’s your revenge! (laughter) One last thing: I just wanted to know why on the publicity pictures there’s no Snow White. Is that just because you were late or was there another reason?

BapQ0a9IcAAbnw9.jpg largeDH: It was. I confirmed a lot later than everyone else. But, you know, that’s quite nice actually. Anyway, it’s called Snow White, isn’t it? You don’t need my face! I’m pale anyway, you know. And it’ll be a nice surprise. People will be like, “Oh, Danielle Hope’s in it!”

HK: Are there any surprises to look forward to – anything we’re maybe not expecting from a traditional Snow White?

DH: Oh goodness, many! But probably different things on different nights. I’m working with an amazing team and they’re all incredibly funny. I’m just playing it straight and trying to keep a straight face but they’re all wickedly funny!

An Interview with Gary Wilmot

HK: So how have you found working on the pantomime this year?

GW: It’s fun. It’s a giggle, and it’s a great bunch of people.

HK: I’ve heard that you’re from Birmingham, so has it been good to be doing a show back at home?

GW: Well, it’s not really my home, but my mum is from Birmingham and I’ve got family who live there, and I’ve spent a lot of time in Birmingham. I’ve been to the Hippodrome lots of times, and the Alex. Years ago I did a show at the gay club called The Peacock but that’s not even there now. I went to the Studio Theatre when I was growing up. So yeah, I like Birmingham very much.

HK: You’re playing the Dame in the show. Is this your first time dressing up in drag?

GW: Erm…sort of, I’ll say yes. It’s my first time doing it in a panto. Years ago I did a sketch programme and we were all required to dress up as women from time to time, but dressing up as a Dame is different. I mean, I’ve never seen a woman dress like that before. I think of her more as a clown than a woman. But it’s not been a problem at all – in fact, the dress is surprisingly comfortable.

HK: Can you tell me a little bit more about your character? How does she fit into the story and what’s her relationship with Snow White?

GW: Yeah, Snow White doesn’t generally have a Dame in it. There isn’t one in the story but for the pantomime they’ve put one in. She’s the cook at the palace and she’s Snow White’s best friend, really. She kind of mothers Snow White a bit. She’s got two sons, and again I’ve never seen these two sons in Snow White before. The three characters are new to the show – they’re the kind of modern addition, if you like. There are a lot of characters in the show who aren’t particularly funny so the Dame comes on really to raise the comedy (there’s some laughing and complaining from other cast members in the background about this!), so that’s what I’m booked for.

HK: Do you have a favourite scene or favourite gag for your character?

Well, I’m not gonna give any gags away now but I do have a favourite one. As for scenes – well, any of the scenes where we’re all interacting. We’ve got a scene where it’s kind of got worse for the Queen and it’s a great ensemble. Everybody mucks in and it’s very, very visual. We’ve actually been rehearsing that all morning.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs opens at the Birmingham Hippodrome on Thursday 19th December and runs until Sunday 2nd February, with a special, relaxed performance on Thursday 30th January. For more information and to book, visit the Birmingham Hippodrome website.

Merry Christmas!

Oh Yes It Is! – Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Panto Press Launch

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Yesterday morning, details of the upcoming Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs pantomime by the Birmingham Hippodrome in association with Qdos Entertainment were released as part of a special media launch. Members of the press were invited to meet with the cast, including its newly revealed leading lady, Danielle Hope, the 21-year-old winner of the BBC’s Over the Rainbow series.

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Along with a couple of my fellow First Night Bloggers, I was lucky enough to be invited along to the launch to catch a glimpse of some of the show’s fantastic set and costumes. After a brief introduction in which we were duly reminded that there were only 92 (now 91) shopping days until Christmas, and only 84 days till the opening of the UK’s biggest pantomime, the cast were revealed in all their glittering, camped-up splendour to an audience which was almost as excited as they were.

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Stephanie Beacham swanned around as an impressively imperious Wicked Queen, her icy image only slightly marred when she took five for a coffee, clutching an incongruous paper cup between long glitzy fingers in pointed, elongated gloves. Young talent Danielle Hope looked every bit the innocent, girlish beauty amongst her more experienced colleagues, while true to form, Gok Wan rattled off jokes and wisecracks, primarily about his own tight-fitting, futuristic Man in the Mirror get-up. Said outfit was described by one interviewer as “Storm Trooper meets Dynasty”: Gok’s own interpretation was rather earthier.

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Once the discussion got underway, members of the cast shared their experiences of Birmingham, of pantomimes and of other similar acting roles. Self-dubbed “panto veteran” Matt Slack (set to play the Queen’s henchman Oddjob), will join Gary Wilmot (the Dame), John Partridge (the Prince) and ventriloquist Paul Zerdin (Muddles), who between them boast a sizeable list of Birmingham Hippodrome panto credits. For Stephanie Beacham, her role in this show is a familiar one, and something of a return to roots: her first experience of the stage was as the Wicked Queen in a pantomime in Golders Green. More recently, she portrayed Elizabeth I at the Birmingham REP, whom she described as “another wicked queen” of sorts. Although new to pantomime, Danielle Hope’s experience playing Dorothy in the West End has amply prepared her for this fairy-tale part as, perhaps, has her favourite childhood past-time of dressing up as princess Snow White. Meanwhile Gok Wan claimed that he’d only come over to Southside for a Chinese takeaway, and had been rather surprised to find himself sitting in front of an audience looking, in his own words, “gayer than ever”.

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Yet, even for those more accustomed to stage acting and pantomimes particularly, this was an occasion for many “firsts”: it was Matt Slack’s first time in a Birmingham Hippodrome pantomime, Gary Wilmot’s first time in a dress, and Danielle Hope’s first time in the fair city of Birmingham.

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A time for firsts and a time for bests, perhaps? Said Michael Harrison, Managing Director of Qdos Entertainment’s Pantomime Division and Director of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs:

“I’m thrilled and delighted to have assembled this galaxy of stars for this year’s spectacular Birmingham Hippodrome pantomime. It’s a long time since Snow White was last performed at the theatre and it seems fitting that its return as Britain’s biggest pantomime should feature such an incredible cast. This brand-new production is set to be the most spectacular Birmingham has ever seen.”

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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs will be showing at the Birmingham Hippodrome from Thursday 19th December 2013 until Sunday 2 February 2014. Tickets are available via the Birmingham Hippodrome website. A relaxed performance, specially adapted for people with learning difficulties, will take place on Thursday 30th January.

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Click here to watch the BBC Midlands Today coverage of the launch.

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